Candide: Novel Summary: Chapters 29-30

Chapter 29: Finally Candide reaches Cunegonde and embraces her, though he is repulsed by her horrid appearance.  When she asks Candide to carry through on his promise to marry her, he agrees, first seeking permission from her brother.  When the baron again refuses to allow it, Candide tells him that he will kill him "all over again."
Chapter 30: Sending the troublesome baron away, Candide does marry his lifelong love, Cunegonde.  After several days of debate between Candide, Martin and Pangloss, it seems Martin has won the overall argument which has traversed the entire book. Though Pangloss still repeats the claims of his optimistic philosophy, Voltaire admits that even the old philosopher himself no longer believes it in his heart.  Later, Pangloss hopes to learn the truth from a wise dervish who he encounters, but the wise man refuses to discuss philosophy.  Thus, Pangloss' notion that this world is the best of all possible worlds is dead. 
Following the example of a neighboring Turk, Candide decides that his household will no longer debate philosophy, saying "we must [simply] cultivate our garden." Pangloss agrees with his young pupil that humans are intended merely to work their land, doing their best to produce for themselves, and not try to comprehend the evil which surrounds them on a daily basis. 

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