Candide: Novel Summary: Chapters 27-28

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Chapter 27

 Now boarding the ship, the relentless Candide again tries to resurrect Pangloss' optimism in front of Martin, asserting that since his circumstances might be worse, all must be for the best.  Martin, of course, is skeptical.

Next speaking to Cacambo, Candide learns that Cunégonde too is a slave, working as a dishwasher, and ugly to boot.  Candide, however, says that he doesn't care what she looks like, as long as he can see her again.
Walking about on ship, Candide spies two convicts who bear a remarkable resemblance to Cunégonde's brother, the baron, and Dr. Pangloss, both thought to be dead.  Getting closer, he realizes that indeed it is them, alive, though not well.  Motioning to the captain, Candide arranges to pay for their release.

Chapter 28

Both the baron and Pangloss explain the circumstances which led to them escaping death. Cunégonde's brother says that he was healed of the sword wound inflicted upon him by Candide.  Pangloss explains how he narrowly escaped hanging, thanks to a knot that stopped the rope from completely suffocating him.  Both men, however, get into trouble (the baron by swimming with an Arab, Pangloss by fondling a young women in a mosque), resulting in their arrest and subsequent captivity.
Nevertheless, the philosopher still maintains his belief in deterministic optimism, asserting, "I am a philosopher, and it would not be right for me to recant since Leibniz could not possibly be wrong."

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