Henry V: Novel Summary: Act 3, Scene 1

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As the English army enters with scaling ladders, Henry urges them on with a stirring speech. He tells them that in peace, passivity and humility are virtues, but in war it is necessary to be ruthless. They must overcome their natural feelings and make themselves hard. He reminds them they are descended from men who were tested by war and experienced in it, and who also fought in France. He urges his foot soldiers and archers to show their mettle, to demonstrate that they are worthy of their upbringing. He does not doubt that they are, and he sees nobility in their eyes. As he leads this latest assault, he encourages them to yell patriotic slogans as they scale the walls of the city.  
Analysis
Henry V is sometimes studied in business schools to analyze the  qualities that make for successful leadership. There is no doubt that Henry does a magnificent job of inspiring and leading his men here. He shows them what attitude of mind is needed, tells them how to attain it, fills them with pride in the exploits of their ancestors, shows he has complete confidence in them, and sends them off to battle with inspirational words ringing in their ears. No leader could do better than that.

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