Henry V: Novel Summary: Act 3, Scene 5

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King Charles and his nobles discuss the situation. The English army is advancing, and the Constable urges action. The Dauphin still has nothing but contempt for the English, a view shared by Bourbon. The Constable has more respect for their foe, but wonders where their strength comes from, since England has such a poor climate. He once again urges action for the honor of France. Despite his confidence, the Dauphin admits that the French nobility have lost the respect of Frenchwomen, who say they are degenerate. The women say they will take lovers from the English soldiers instead. Bourbon echoes the Dauphin's views.
Charles tells his nobles to take to the battlefield and capture Henry and bring him prisoner to Rouen. The Constable is confident of victory. He knows that the English are few in number and are sick and hungry after their  march. He thinks that as soon as Henry sees the superior French army he will be struck with fear and try to negotiate a ransom.
Charles sends Montjoy the herald to Henry to ask what ransom he is prepared to offer. He tells the Dauphin to stay with him in Rouen, and tells the Constable and the others to quickly inform him of England's defeat.
Analysis
The attitudes shown by the French have not changed much since they were last seen in Act 2 Scene 4. As in that scene, the Constable strikes a warning note, but the Dauphin will not listen.

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