Henry V: Novel Summary: Act 4, Scene 2

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As in Act 3 scene 7, the French nobles are eager for battle. The Constable is so convinced of the weakness of the English army that he complains there is not enough killing work to go around for the French. Some will have to sheath their weapons unused. He believes that even the approach of the French will so scare the English that they will crouch in fear and yield. Grandpre adds his similar sentiments. He speaks of the English as if they are already dead. The crows are flying overhead, waiting to eat their dead flesh.
The nobles exit, brimming with confidence.
Analysis
There is little new here in the portrayal of the over-confidence of the French. The scenes with the French nobles are brimming with dramatic irony, which is when the audience is aware of facts and situations that the characters on stage are unaware of. All audiences know, from Shakespeare's time to our own, what the result of the battle will be. They are in on the secret. There is therefore a kind of pleasure in watching these scenes, a pleasure that comes from knowing in advance that arrogance will be brought low and complacency punished.

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