Lord of the Flies: Novel Summary: Chapter 9

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Golding’s ninth chapter mostly concerns Simon. The chapter begins with Simon sleeping in the creepers. Golding explains, "With the running of the blood Simon’s fit passed into the weariness of sleep."
Yet Simon is much changed from the preceding affairs concerning his conversation with the beast. Again Golding explains, "The usual brightness was gone from his eyes and he walked with a sort of glum determination like an old man." Simon has lost his innocence; he knows more than anyone else about the beast, which is taking its toll on his body.
The parachute man is soon swarmed with the flies. This is quite fitting— the order that the man represents is being replaced with the chaos of the beast. This also is parallel to the pain Piggy gets in his head at this time. His logic is being impaired as the beast grows in power and control of their island society.
Soon Simon decides to tell the others about the beast. Golding narrates Simon’s thoughts. "The beast was harmless and horrible; and the news must reach the others as soon as possible."
The change in power from the parachutist to the Lord of the Flies mirrors the change in power from Ralph to Jack. Golding follows, "Power lay in the brown swell of his forearms; authority sat on his shoulder and chattered in his ear like an ape." Here, the author proves that Jack has replaced Ralph as chief, not democratically, but practically.
Soon all the boys, including Ralph and Piggy, congregate around a bonfire where the sow is being cooked and eaten. During another of their pagan-like chanting ceremonies where they pretend to kill the pig, Simon appears. In the darkness the boys believe that Simon is the beast, so they descend upon him, slowly murdering the poor boy. Simon’s body gradually floats out to sea. Here the Christ metaphor for Simon is strongest.

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