The Speck In Space


A poetry Anthology 


I have desired to go
Where springs not fail,
To fields where flies no sharp and sided hail
And a few lilies blow.
And I have asked to be
Where no storms come,
Where the green swell is in the havens dumb,
And out of the swing of the sea.
Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889)

In Heaven-Haven, Hopkins not only prays for a day when he
can be free of the physical stresses of the world, but also
the emotional pains. Life is filled with turbulent storms
of anger and despair. Hopkins sees Heaven (death) as an
escape from the harsh "sharp and sided" reality of life.
Life to Hopkins is a sea. One moment a man is rich and
happy and the next fate has thrown him a curveball and sent
him to the poorhouse. There is no escaping the acrid
aspects of life, so Hopkins turns to death.
Throughout the World
Throughout the world, if it were sought,
Fair words enough a man shall find:
They be good cheap, they cost right nought,
Their substance is but only wind:
But well to say and so to mean,
That sweet accord is seldom seen.
Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503-1542)

Wyatt is sharply criticizing society. Words are free for
anyone to use and something complimentary or pleasant is so
easy to say, yet "seldom" are such words heard. In Wyatt's
eyes people are bitter and do not take the time to praise
ones fellow person. Wyatt believes that words are valuable
and powerful yet ironically are nothing but air. Why are
people so harsh when being polite costs nothing more?
Space Oddity
Ground Control to Major Tom x2
"Take your protein pills and put your helmet on"
Ground Control to Major Tom
"Commencing countdown engines on Check ignition and may
gods love be with you"
This is Ground Control to Major Tom 

"you have really made the grade and the papers want to know
who judge you where,
now its time to leave the capsule if you dare"
This is Major Tom to Ground Control 

"I am stepping through the door and I am floating in the
most of peculiar way 

and the stars look very different today. For here am I
sitting in a tin can,
far above the world, planet earth is blue and their is
nothing I can do..... Though I am across a 100,000 miles, I
am feeling very skilled and I think my spaceship knows
which way to go. Tell my wife I love her very much." 

[G.C.] "She knows"
Ground Control to Major Tom "Your circuits dead their is
something wrong. 

Can you here me Major Tom ?" (x3)
[Major Tom] "Here am I floating in a tin can far above the
planet Earth is blue and their is nothing I can do." 

David Bowie 

David Bowie captures the futility and insignificance of
man. Major Tom's epic journey into space has really
produced nothing. When Major Tom looks out on the Earth he
feels "skilled" and powerful, even though he is a hundred
thousand miles away from Earth and powerless to do anything
but "float in a tin can." Then at the peek of Major Tom's
accomplishment his circuits go dead and he is stuck in
space. The once "powerful" Major Tom is now stuck a hundred
thousand miles away from Earth with no way of returning.
David Bowie realizes the insignificance of man in the
Universe and expresses that feeling in this song. The
futility which Major Tom suffers from is shared by all

Grand is the Seen
Grand is the seen, the light to me - grand are the sky and
the stars,
Grand is the Earth, and grand are lasting time and space,
and Grand their laws, so multiform, so puzzling,
But grander far the unseen soul of me, comprehending,
endowing all those,
Lighting the light, the sky and the stars, delving the
Earth, sailing the sea,
(What were all those, indeed, without thee, unseen soul? Of
what amount without thee?)
More evolutionary, vast, puzzling, O my soul!
More multiform far - more lasting thou than they.
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman begins by expressing his awe of natures
deepest mysteries such as "lasting time and space." This
reflection leads him to be far more perplexed and mystifies
he realizes gives the stars and the sky significance. His
"unseen soul" allows him to comprehend and appreciate the
true scope and magnitude of the Universe. The gift of man
is that "unseen soul." That which separates us from the
rest of the animal kingdom.
Bright Star!
Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art
Bright star! Would I were steadfast as thou art-
Not in lone splendor hung aloft the night
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
Of pure ablution round Earth's human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors - 

No - yet still steadfast, still unchangeable,
Pillowed upon my fair love's ripening breast,
To feel forever its soft fall and swell,
Awake forever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever - or else swoon to death.
John Keats

Here to in this poem is mans insignificance portrayed. The
bright star, lit through the ages, is not affected by the
movement of the seas, the tides of storms, nor the acts of
man. The love the man in the poem expresses for this woman
is vacillating and exits for just a brief time in the eyes
of the star. The man in the poem wants to be as steadfast
as the star; to forever be able to hear her sweet breath
and feel her "ripening breast." His wish is to live
forever, to take in these wonders, or die. 

What makes space the final frontier?
A vast emptiness can offer us
Giant boulders and fiery furnaces
do not hand out the meaning of life
they do not cure the cancer in man 

nor do they bring an end to war
the knowing eye looks inward
looks for the answers where answers are found
it does not run into a vacuum for
The 3rd rock
The "Undiscovered Planet"

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