Anna Karenina: Novel Summary: Part 8 section 10-Part 8 section 19

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Part 8 section 10: Levin has many duties which he enjoys such as taking care of the farm, managing Dolly's affairs, caring about the baby, and a new hobby - beekeeping.  He enjoys doing these things, as it appears to him that he cannot do otherwise. 

Part 8 section 11: The day that Koznyshev arrives is a very busy day, and again Levin wonders why all of them are living and doing the things they do.  He talks to one of his workers who mentions a wealthy peasant who lives for his soul and remembers God (788).  Levin wonders what he means by this and gets excited when thinking about it.

Part 8 section 12: He goes somewhere to think alone and realizes that living for God and not for one's own needs is having faith.  He has been looking for a miracle, when the answer has been around him all along.  He realizes that the meaning of life is to live for God.  He had been living by the truths he had learned when young, and now realizes that this means he had been living with faith. 

Part 8 section 13: Levin tries to think if there is anything that contradicts what he is now thinking.  He thinks about the teachings of the Church and decides that he believes them.  Levin is happy that he has found the answer.

Part 8 section 14: The coachman arrives and tells Levin that his brother and another gentleman have arrived.  Levin starts driving back and thinks that everything has changed now and that he will never quarrel with anyone again.  Just then though, the coachman gives Levin some driving advice, and Levin snaps back at him to stop and realizes that his relations with others will not change so much as he thought.  On his way back he sees the others walking out to the apiary and greets them.  He learns that Kitty has taken their son into the woods for a nap since it is so hot in the house.  Levin still does not feel close to his brother.

Part 8 section 15: Dolly tells Levin that Koznyshev traveled with Vronsky on the train and that he is on his way to the war.  The all talk about the war and some do not understand why men are going at all.  Levin does not understand how men can take it upon themselves to start a war without the Government declaring war.  The discussion continues.

Part 8 section 16: They talk more about the war and voting, and Kitty's father expresses disbelief that Oblonsky could get such money in his new post when he isn't even sure that the job is useful.  Koznyshev is irritated because his comments are not to the point.  Levin cannot agree that the Volunteers and the newspapers really represent the will of the people as his brother and others are arguing, as he does not see it in the people around him.  Levin wants to stop arguing, so he draws attention to the clouds that are gathering.

Part 8 section 17: They all hurry back as the clouds are getting darker and the wind is picking up.  They arrive back at the house to learn that Kitty, Mitya and the nurse are still in the woods, and it has started to rain.  Levin fights the wind to go into the woods and sees lightning start a fire and knock down a tree in their usual spot.  Levin calls on God and runs into the woods and sees Kitty and the nurse calling to him.  They are all fine, and they go home.

Part 8 section 18: It continues to rain so they all spend the day indoors.  Levin is called to the nursery.  On his way he wonders about other faiths such as the Buddhist and Mahomedan faiths.  They also teach and do good, so are they also not right? In the nursery Kitty shows Levin that Mitya protests when the cook stands over him, but is happy when Kitty stands over him.  So they know that know Mitya recognizes her, and he also recognizes the nurse and Levin.  Levin tells Kitty that the pity he felt for their son is gone and that after the fright in the storm he realizes how much he loves him. 

Part 8 section 19: Levin leaves the nursery and stops on the balcony on his way to the drawing room.  He thinks again of the other faiths and decides that it is not his right or duty to decide if all of those people have faith.  Kitty comes out there with him and sees that he has changed and understands that he has found faith.  He wonders if he should talk to her about it, but decides against it.  Levin realizes that his new faith will not change things utterly as he thought it would, but he has now found meaning in his life.

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