Animal Farm: Novel Summary: Chapter 5

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Orwell's fifth chapter is an action-packed tale of two animals who leave the farm.  First Mollie, who never was too fond of the whole idea of revolution since it meant she wouldn't have any more sugar lumps, is seen talking to a neighbor man and letting him stroke her nose.  When confronted by Clover, she denies it, then runs away forever.   "None of the other animals ever mentioned Mollie again." 

Next, Orwell again addresses the enmity between Snowball and Napoleon.  This time the two are arguing over Snowball's plan to build a windmill.   But during the debate, something terrible happens.  Instead of letting the animals decide whether or not to build the structure, Napoleon signals his private troop of attack dogs who chase Snowball off the stage and under the fence, never to be seen again.  

Soon Squealer is sent in to convince the animals that Napoleon really is a good leader, even though he tries to kill those who oppose him.  Then he attempts to drum up more support for Napoleon with this propaganda:  

"Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure.   On the contrary, it is a deep and heavy responsibility.  No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal.  He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves.    But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be?" 

The classic hypocrisy seen here is too hard to miss.  If all animals are really equal, then wouldn't it be just as likely that Napoleon might make a mistake?  Wouldn't it be easier to make the right decision when all the animals are collaborating instead of placing their lives in the hands of a tyrant?  Besides who did Mr. Jones turn into anyway? 

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