Emma: Novel Summary: Chapter 4- Chapter 6

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Chapter 4: Harriet soon becomes a regular visitor to Hartfield and a walking partner to Emma.  When Emma realizes that the Mr. Martin that Harriet talks about is the son, not the husband, of Mrs. Martin, Emma fears that he has designs on Harriet.  She tries to get Harriet to talk about him to see if Harriet has feelings for him.  She tries to show Harriet that he is in too low of a station for her, and tells her that she herself cannot associate with them.  Emma suggests that Harriet have nothing more to do with the Martins, as she cannot have odd acquaintances if she is to be well connected.  The very next day the two young women happen upon Mr. Martin, and after their meeting, Emma is able to talk Harriet into believing that he is not a very remarkable man and that he cannot compare to a man like Mr. Elton.  Emma speaks more and more of Mr. Elton to Harriet, as she has him in mind for driving Mr. Martin out of Harriet's thoughts. 
Chapter 5: Mr. Knightley asks Mrs. Weston what she thinks of the friendship between Emma and Harriet, as he thinks that neither will do the other any good.  Mrs. Weston says that she can understand his objection to Harriet, as she is not as superior as a friend of Emma ought to be.  Knightley says that Harriet will not induce Emma to improve herself, and that Emma does not take on anything requiring industry or patience, like reading.  He says that Harriet just looks on Emma as if she knows everything.  He also states that Harriet will be no better for the friendship, as Emma will only make her not want to associate with people in her own sphere. 
Chapter 6: After a few visits together, Emma is soon convinced that Mr. Elton is falling in love with Harriet, and is certain of her returning the feelings.  She believes it even more when he strongly agrees with her suggestion that Harriet's portrait be drawn and suggests that Emma herself draw it.  The sittings begin, and Mr. Elton is invited to attend them and to read to them.  When the portrait is finished he highly praises it and defends it against any criticism.  He offers to take it to London to have it framed.

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