Romeo and Juliet: Novel Summary: Act II, Scene 2-Act II, Scene 3

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Act II, Scene 2: Romeo finds himself in Capulet's orchard and sees Juliet at her window.  He compares her to the sun, a light in his nighttime world. She speaks, not knowing he is there, and expresses her love for him.  She realizes that it is simply his name that is her enemy.  The name Montague does not define Romeo but it does impact his social relationship with others, specifically her family.  If Romeo gave up his name, the problem with her family would not exist and she would have her love.  At this, Romeo steps from the shadows and declares his lover for her.  He will do anything for her love.  Juliet fears that her family will discover and harm him.  She also asks that he pledge his love to her again, though she realizes that he may be lying to her.  She admits that she is smitten with him, perhaps more than is proper, but she vows that she will prove herself to be as serious as she hopes he is.  They exchange vows of love until the Nurse interrupts them, calling for her charge.  Juliet exits briefly but quickly returns to Romeo.  The Nurse instantly begins to holler for her again so the lovers quickly make plans to marry.  They part at the break of dawn, expressing their longing for the moment when they can next be together. 
Act II, Scene 3: The Friar Lawrence is in his cell philosophizing to himself and tending to his garden when Romeo rushes in.  He tells the Friar that he and Juliet have fallen in love and begs to be married.  The Friar is surprised at how quickly Romeo has forgotten Rosaline and worries that his love for Juliet is just as superficial.  Despite his misgivings, he agrees to marry the lovers in the hope that it will ease the tensions between the feuding families. 

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