Henry V: Novel Summary: Act 4, Scene 4

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During the battle, Pistol encounters a French soldier and demands that he yield. Pistol comically misunderstands the Frenchman's words, and demands a ransom. He then misunderstands the French soldier's desperate exclamations, thinking that the poor man is offering him a bushel of corn, and then some brass (Pistol misinterprets the French word, bras, "arms"). He gets the Boy to talk to the Frenchman, whose name is Monsieur le Fer, who then offers two hundred crowns in ransom. This satisfies Pistol, who spares the man's life. Le Fer gives profuse thanks; he thinks Pistol is a great warrior.
After Pistol and le Fer exit, the Boy makes disparaging remarks about Pistol. Even Bardolph and Nym are far braver than he, and they have both been hanged (this is the last mention of Nym, whose crime is undisclosed). The Boy goes off to help guard the English luggage, which is watched over only by boys.
Analysis
As earlier scenes have already made clear, for Pistol the war is about making some money. And here he does so. The scene makes a telling contrast to the noble speeches and sentiments that are still ringing in the ears of the audience from the previous scene. There is nothing heroic about this little encounter, as the Boy tells us (if we were in any doubt). 

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